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6 Surefire Signs It's Time To Sell Your Home

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Angela Colley

Most people don’t plan on living in their first (or second or maybe even third) home forever, but knowing when the time is right to put that baby on the market can be tricky

In fact, it can feel kind of like breaking up with a longtime boyfriend or girlfriend. Deep down, you knew you wouldn’t be with that person forever—but ending things can be way easier said than done.

Sometimes life changes force the issue: There’s little reason for self-doubt or trauma-level angst if you’re relocating to another state or you know your newborn twins won’t fit in your one-bedroom bungalow. But without a pressing reason staring you in the face, it can be hard to know when you’ve outgrown your home.

So how do you know when it’s the right time to let go?

1. You’re feeling cramped, and you can’t add on

Your family might not be growing, but that doesn’t mean your lifestyle still fits in your current house.

If you’ve started working from home, for example, or you’ve adopted an extended family of indoor cats—or maybe you’ve just never gotten over your dream of having a sewing room—your house might be too small.

But before you jump to conclusions, see if paring down your possessions works to free up some space.

Another option might be to finish an attic or basement, add another room, or even add a whole story to your home. But, of course, that won’t work for everyone.

“If your property isn’t large enough or your municipality doesn’t allow it, moving to a bigger home may be your best option,” says Will Featherstone, founder of Featherstone & Co. of Keller Williams Excellence in Baltimore.

To decide which route to take, check your local building laws and get estimates from two or three contractors. It also wouldn’t hurt to check with your REALTOR®. Sometimes adding on won’t increase the value of a home, and you don’t want to make big-time improvements that will bring only a small-time return on your investment.

2. You have too much space

On the other hand, perhaps you’re feeling overwhelmed by vacant rooms and silence. (Hello, empty nesters!)

“In this case, it no longer makes sense to have, say, four bedrooms and a basement,” Featherstone says.

Saying goodbye to a family home can be difficult, but you should consider how feasible it is to stay. If yardwork and house upkeep are getting to be a little too much, or soaring utility bills are cramping your style, it might make more sense to move.

3. You’re over the neighborhood

Maybe you can no longer deal with the rigid rules of your homeowners association, or perhaps your neighbors turned their house into a rental for frat guys. Whatever the reason, neighborhood dynamics can change dramatically over time.

And sometimes, you can change. Maybe the 40-minute commute to work didn’t seem like such a big deal the first few years, but now you’re dreading it every day. Or your kids are getting older, which can be a big problem if you’re not in the right location.

“If you can’t afford a private school system, you are limited to one school for your children,” Featherstone says. “Moving may be a benefit to your child’s education.”

4. Remodeling won’t offer a return on your investment

Giving your kitchen or bathroom a face-lift can make your house feel like new again, which might be all you need to decide you want to stay put for years. But that doesn’t mean it’s a financially sound decision.

“Before making significant improvements, you should really study the neighborhood and know the highest price point of your neighborhood,” Featherstone says.

If your home is already similar in style and condition of some of the priciest homes in the neighborhood, remodeling might be a bad idea, and you should consider selling instead.

5. You can afford to sell

Sure, you’re going to make money when you actually sell your house, but as the adage goes, it takes money to make money. So seller beware: You probably won’t be sitting around and waiting for the dollars to roll in.

“Before you consider selling, you should have the funds available to prepare your home for sale,” Featherstone says.

Most sellers need to make some minor improvements such as painting, landscaping, or updating flooring to get a good price on their home. Those costs will come out of your pocket at first, so it’s a good idea to have a cushion before you start.

6. You’re ready to compete

If you’re living in a seller’s market, you might be enticed to offload your home before things cool off. But don’t forget—once you sell, you’ll probably be a buyer, too.

“If your market is hot, your home may sell quickly and for top dollar, but keep in mind the home you buy also will be more expensive,” Featherstone says.

If you’re going to get out there, you should make sure you’re ready to compete.

If you are looking to sell your coastside home, The Ream Team is here to help you with all of your real estate needs. Contact us today

Find out what your home is worth with our no obligation home valuation tool.

Are You Getting The Home Tax Deductions You're Entitled To?

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Owning a home can pay off at tax time.

Take advantage of these home ownership-related tax deductions and strategies to lower your tax bill:

Mortgage Interest Deduction

One of the neatest deductions itemizing homeowners can take advantage of is the mortgage interest deduction, which you claim on Schedule A. To get the mortgage interest deduction, your mortgage must be secured by your home — and your home can be a house, trailer, or boat, as long as you can sleep in it, cook in it, and it has a toilet.

Interest you pay on a mortgage of up to $1 million — or $500,000 if you’re married filing separately — is deductible when you use the loan to buy, build, or improve your home.

If you take on another mortgage (including a second mortgage, home equity loan, or home equity line of credit) to improve your home or to buy or build a second home, that counts towards the $1 million limit.

If you use loans secured by your home for other things — like sending your kid to college — you can still deduct the interest on loans up $100,000 ($50,000 for married filing separately) because your home secures the loan.

Prepaid Interest Deduction

Prepaid interest (or points) you paid when you took out your mortgage is generally 100% deductible in the year you paid it along with other mortgage interest.

If you refinance your mortgage and use that money for home improvements, any points you pay are also deductible in the same year.

But if you refinance to get a better rate or shorten the length of your mortgage, or to use the money for something other than home improvements, such as college tuition, you’ll need to deduct the points over the life of your mortgage. Say you refi into a 10-year mortgage and pay $3,000 in points. You can deduct $300 per year for 10 years.

So what happens if you refi again down the road?

Example: Three years after your first refi, you refinance again. Using the $3,000 in points scenario above, you’ll have deducted $900 ($300 x 3 years) so far. That leaves $2,400, which you can deduct in full the year you complete your second refi. If you paid points for the new loan, the process starts again; you can deduct the points over the life of the loan.

Home mortgage interest and points are reported on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040.

Your lender will send you a Form 1098 that lists the points you paid. If not, you should be able to find the amount listed on the HUD-1 settlement sheet you got when you closed the purchase of your home or your refinance closing.

Property Tax Deduction

You can deduct on Schedule A the real estate property taxes you pay. If you have a mortgage with an escrow account, the amount of real estate property taxes you paid shows up on your annual escrow statement.

If you bought a house this year, check your HUD-1 settlement statement to see if you paid any property taxes when you closed the purchase of your house. Those taxes are deductible on Schedule A, too.

PMI and FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

You can deduct the cost of private mortgage insurance (PMI) as mortgage interest on Schedule A if you itemize your return. The change only applies to loans taken out in 2007 or later.

What’s PMI? If you have a mortgage but didn’t put down a fairly good-sized down payment (usually 20%), the lender requires the mortgage be insured. The premium on that insurance can be deducted, so long as your income is less than $100,000 (or $50,000 for married filing separately).

If your adjusted gross income is more than $100,000, your deduction is reduced by 10% for each $1,000 ($500 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return) that your adjusted gross income exceeds $100,000 ($50,000 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return). So, if you make $110,000 or more, you can’t claim the deduction (10% x 10 = 100%).

Besides private mortgage insurance, there’s government insurance from FHA, VA, and the Rural Housing Service. Some of those premiums are paid at closing, and deducting them is complicated. A tax adviser or tax software program can help you calculate this deduction. Also, the rules vary between the agencies.

Vacation Home Tax Deductions

The rules on tax deductions for vacation homes are complicated. Do yourself a favor and keep good records about how and when you use your vacation home.

If you’re the only one using your vacation home (you don’t rent it out for more than 14 days a year), you deduct mortgage interest and real estate taxes on Schedule A.

Rent your vacation home out for more than 14 days and use it yourself fewer than 15 days (or 10% of total rental days, whichever is greater), and it’s treated like a rental property. Your expenses are deducted on Schedule E.

Rent your home for part of the year and use it yourself for more than the greater of 14 days or 10% of the days you rent it and you have to keep track of income, expenses, and allocate them based on how often you used and how often you rented the house.

Homebuyer Tax Credit

This isn’t a deduction, but it’s important to keep track of if you claimed it in 2008.

There were federal first-time homebuyer tax credits in 2008, 2009, and 2010.

If you claimed the homebuyer tax credit for a purchase made after April 8, 2008, and before Jan. 1, 2009, you must repay 1/15th of the credit over 15 years, with no interest.

The IRS has a tool you can use to help figure out what you owe each year until it’s paid off. Or if the home stops being your main home, you may need to add the remaining unpaid credit amount to your income tax on your next tax return.

Generally, you don’t have to pay back the credit if you bought your home in 2009, 2010, or early 2011. The exception: You have to repay the full credit amount if you sold your house or stopped using it as primary residence within 36 months of the purchase date. Then you must repay it with your tax return for the year the home stopped being your principal residence.

The repayment rules are less rigorous for uniformed service members, Foreign Service workers, and intelligence community workers who got sent on extended duty at least 50 miles from their principal residence.

Energy-Efficiency Upgrades

The Nonbusiness Energy Tax Credit lets you claim a credit for installing energy-efficient home systems. Tax credits are especially valuable because they let you offset what you owe the IRS dollar for dollar, in this case, for up to 10% of the amount you spent on certain upgrades.

The credit carries a lifetime cap of $500 (less for some products), so if you’ve used it in years past, you’ll have to subtract prior tax credits from that $500 limit. Lucky for you, there’s no cap on how much you’ll save on utility bills thanks to your energy-efficiency upgrades.

Among the upgrades that might qualify for the credit:

  • Biomass stoves
  • Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning
  • Insulation
  • Roofs (metal and asphalt)
  • Water heaters (non-solar)
  • Windows, doors, and skylights

File IRS Form 5695 with your return.

This article provides general information about tax laws and consequences, but shouldn’t be relied upon as tax or legal advice applicable to particular transactions or circumstances. Consult a tax professional for such advice; tax laws may vary by jurisdiction.

What Happens If I Skip A Mortgage Payment?

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Daniel Bortz

"What happens if I skip a mortgage payment?" is one of those questions we hope you never have to ask, but life is unpredictable: Sometimes no matter how carefully you plan, you may find yourself short on the funds you need to pay this crucial monthly bill. So what happens if you skip a mortgage payment for just one month?

Don’t worry—there's no need to panic quite yet. But there are consequences to missing a mortgage payment, so you'll want to know what's in store.

What if you're late on your mortgage payment? 
Every home loan agreement offers borrowers a grace period for late payments. (Most mortgage payments are due the first day of the month but policies can vary, says Guy Cecala, chief executive and publisher of Inside Mortgage Finance.) Typically, there’s a 15-day grace period, in which case you would have 14 days after your payment is due to pay your bill without incurring a late fee. However, “I’ve seen some late fees kick in after seven days,” Cecala says, who recommends checking your policy carefully to see how long your grace period is.

Late fees are based on your mortgage agreement, loan type, and state regulations, but generally the average is 4% to 5% of the overdue payment. So, for a $1,000 monthly mortgage with a 5% late penalty, the fee would be $50. That might seem like a drop in the bucket, but “late fees are a good source of income for mortgage lenders,” Cecala points out.

How a missed mortgage payment affects your credit
Mortgage lenders typically report late payments to credit bureaus after they become 60 days past due—meaning you usually have two months to make up for a missed payment. After the 60-day mark though, your credit score (a reflection of how you've managed past debts) might take a big hit.

According to data from credit analysis firm FICO, someone with an excellent credit score—780 or above—could see it drop 90 to 110 points if the person has never missed a payment on any credit account. In comparison, someone with a 680 credit score and two pre-existing late payments on his credit report may see a 60- to 80-point drop for a mortgage payment delinquency.

Will my bank start foreclosure proceedings if I miss one payment?
The short answer is no.

“The foreclosure process takes a lot longer these days because of the foreclosure crisis [of 2008],” Cecala says. “Mortgage lenders don’t want to foreclose on your home because it results in a loss or a cost to them."

Nonetheless, your mortgage is technically in default if you’re more than 90 days late on your mortgage payments—even just one. At that point, you’ll receive a letter from your mortgage servicer notifying you that you’ve defaulted on your loan; you then typically have 90 days to pay off your most recent bill before your mortgage lender can begin foreclosure proceedings.

I don't think I can make next month’s payment. What are my options?
Your first step is to contact your mortgage servicer and explain your financial situation. “People often feel like they don’t want to turn themselves in, but you don’t know what your options are until you talk to your lender,” Cecala says. Plus, mortgage lenders tend be more accommodating if you notify them in advance that you can’t make an upcoming payment.

You might qualify for a special forbearance, a process where your servicer gives you a temporary break from your mortgage payments.

“It’s essentially an extended grace period,” says Cecala. Alternatively, you may be able to work out a repayment plan with your lender where you agree to pay down past-due amounts on your mortgage over a set period of time.

If you can’t afford to make your mortgage payments (say, due to a layoff or emergency medical expenses), Cecala also recommends looking at the federal government’s Home Affordable Modification Program.

“Through HAMP, homeowners who are not unemployed but struggling to make their monthly mortgage payments may lower their monthly payments and make them more affordable and sustainable for the long-term,” says the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s website. You’ll have to meet certain requirements to qualify. For example, you must have obtained your mortgage before Jan. 2, 2009, and “in general you can’t qualify if you have a jumbo loan,” Cecala says. (Call 1-888-995-4673 for free to speak with a HUD-approved housing counselor to see if you can take advantage of the program.)

How can I avoid a missed payment in the future?
The best way to ensure you won’t miss a mortgage payment, says Cecala, is to set up automatic bill pay so that the money is automatically withdrawn from your bank account each month. (You can do this easily through your bank either online or by phone.) You may even want to set up a dedicated checking account for your mortgage payments, and make arrangements with your employer to have a percentage of your income automatically deposited into the account each month.

Cecala offers one more tip: “If you run into problems making your mortgage payments, you probably want to avoid debt consolidation services. There are costs attached to them,” he says. “You’re generally always better off working with your loan servicer or a nonprofit that offers counseling and mortgage relief services.”

Market Snapshot: San Mateo County Real Estate Report

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Here is an updated Market Report summarizing recent real estate activity along the coastside. Please keep in mind that the values represented are based on current, detailed information from the regional Multiple Listing Service. If you need clarification on any of the figures or if you wish to take additional steps toward property ownership, please let us know. We are happy to help you. See the full report.

C.A.R Forecast: Housing Market Will Keep Going Strong in 2018

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

California’s economy is expected to grow and bring forward a strong housing demand in 2018, according to the California Association of Realtors. The housing market will keep growing, albeit at a slower pace, the slowdown being attributed to the supply challenges that will carry on in the next year, as per the report.

Median home prices in California are estimated to rise 4.2% in 2018 to $561,000—a percentage well below the projected 7.2% increase in 2017 to $538,500.

The Association predicts a slight increase of 1.0% in existing single-family home sales, and a total of 426,200 units sold in 2018. The estimated figure for 2018 marks a small uptick from this year’s sales projection of 421,900 units, and not enough to satisfy the strong housing demand, especially in the lower-end segment.

C.A.R. predicts an increase in U.S. GDP of 2.3% in 2018, roughly on par with the projected gain of 2.1% in 2017. California’s unemployment rate is expected to drop to 4.6% next year, after resting at 4.8% in 2017 and 5.5% in 2016.

Mortgage interest rates will remain low in California, even if the 2018 forecast predicts an increase of 4.3%, up from 4.0% in 2017 and 3.6% in 2016.

C.A.R. President Geoff McIntosh said that the “solid job growth” will create a demand for housing in 2018, “however, a persistent shortage of homes for sale and increasing home prices will dictate the market, as housing affordability diminishes for buyers struggling to get into the market.”

Moreover, the limited supply has been “the new ‘norm’ for the past few years,” according to Leslie Appleton-Young, C.A.R senior vice president & chief economist. Appleton-Young foresees that the 2018 housing market will be a “tale of two markets – the inventory constrained lower end and the upper end that’s non-inventory constrained.” It is thus very likely that 2018 sales growth will remain low, while prices will be driven up by a competitive market.

 

3 Things To Do Now If You're Buying in 2018

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Planning on a move in 2018? Start preparing now! It doesn’t matter if you’re thinking of entering the real estate market this month or six months from now; preparing today will help make the process a little less stressful. Here are three things that will really help in preparing.

Check Your Credit & Get Pre-approved: 

Take a look at your credit score. You'll want to make sure that your credit is in good standing. If there are any issues, take care of them. If you have a high credit score, you'll get a better finance rate, which could save you on your mortgage payments. 

 

After you know your credit is in check, you can work with a mortgage lender to get pre-approved. Getting pre-approved for a mortgage tells you how much you can afford and when it comes time to make an offer, the sellers will see that you can, in fact, afford the house. 

 

A mortgage broker can be a big help in this process. If you need a good recommendation, email me back and I’ll help connect you to one. 

Make a Wants & Needs List:

The all-important question is, what are you looking for in your next home? A lot of people waste time looking at properties they would have never looked at if they’d just taken some time to prioritize their wants and needs. So, start searching online to help you gain a sense of what it is you desire. Make a list of your top three needs and top three wants. If you’d like some properties emailed to you, just click here therainteam@coastal-realestate.com to send me an email and I’ll get you set up.

If You’re Selling:

Start looking at any improvements that you can make to help your home sell. Make repairs, get rid of clutter, and make your home presentable for potential buyers. Knowing your home’s value is helpful in starting the process and knowing where to invest your money. Again, just reply to this email and I’ll help you get the most current value of your home.

 

These ideas are just a snapshot of things to help you get started in your new home search. I would like to guide you through the entire process and help you every step of the way. If you have a question about this or any other news you might have heard about the industry, I’m here to help. Give us a call. 

Market Snapshot: San Mateo County Real Estate Report

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Here is an updated Market Report summarizing recent real estate activity along the coastside. Please keep in mind that the values represented are based on current, detailed information from the regional Multiple Listing Service. If you need clarification on any of the figures or if you wish to take additional steps toward property ownership, please let us know. We are happy to help you. See the full report.


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: What It Means for Homeowners

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team
Congress has now passed a sweeping tax bill that will affect almost every American. In addition to changing tax rates and deductions, these new rules affect a wide variety of personal and business activity.
 
The National Association of Realtors® has compiled a summary of provisions of interest, which may be of relevance to you.
We hope this information is helpful as you discuss The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act's impact with your financial advisor or legal counsel.
 
The Rain Team is here to help you with all of your real estate needs. Contact us today to see how we can help.

The New Tax Law and Its Housing Impact

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team
 Upcoming Changes for Some Home Buyers & Homeowners  

 By: Andy Block

Mortgage Advisor and Personal Finance Advisor

 
Under the new tax law, homeowners will have decisions to make in 2018, due to reductions or elimination of certain deductions under the new tax law.  
   
Real Estate: How The New Tax Law Compares to the Old Tax Law  
   
Measure Old Tax Law New Tax Law
Mortgage Interest Deduction Could deduct interest on up to 
$1 million in mortgages on primary & secondary residences
Can deduct interest on up to 
$750,000 in mortgages on 
primary & secondary residences
State and Local income, sales & Property Taxes  Can be deducted from federal income taxes Caps Federal income tax deduction at no more than $10,000 for total of all local state income, property and sales taxes
Interest on home equity debt (HELOCs) Home equity debt interest 
is deductible up to $100,000 if not disallowed by the AMT
Cannot deduct interest on home equity debt-new or existing on personal residence unless improving the residence* 

Equity debt on the personal residence is deductible if it is used to finance 
or improve a rental property
Capital Gains on Home Sales Can exclude up to $500,000 of gain for joint filers or $250,000 of gain for 
single filers from capital gains when selling a primary home, as long as the homeowner has lived in the 
residence for 2 of the past 5 years
No change
Source: Factcheck.org
 
$937,500 in purchase mortgages is the Max deduction for Mortgage Interest with 20% down.
The mortgage interest deduction is now limited to mortgages totaling up to $750,000 for primary and secondary homes. This means that homebuyers with a 20% down payment can only deduct 100% of the interest from their mortgages if their purchase price total is less than $937,500. 

 

Property Tax Impacts in High Tax States
State income tax, sales tax and property tax deductions (SALT) are now capped at $10,000 total. This is a significant hit for many high tax state residents in high cost areas. 

 

Tax Plan Calculator: Estimate Your Tax Liability
What does this mean for your bottom line? The Wall Street Journal’s tax plan calculator analyzes the impact of the biggest factors in the bill, so you can estimate your tax liability for 2018 through 2027. Click here for The Wall Street Journal Tax Plan Calculator.
 
Common Scenarios: How the Tax Bill Will Affect 8 Families
Bloomberg shows how taxes owed on wage and pass-through income (from a business you own) will change in 2018. These scenarios may remind you of someone you know: 
  • The multimillionaires in New York
  • The second home scenario in California
  • The small business owners in Pittsburgh
  • The suburban family in Westchester
  • Single in Manhattan
  • Married in Austin – a young couple who rents
  • Median income in Oregon
  • Renting in Milwaukee
 
Tax Workaround for Vacation Homes
Owners and buyers of second homes can potentially turn their vacation homes into an investment property by setting up a limited liability company. That allows them to write off interest and upkeep, while using the property part of the year for themselves, according to The Denver Post. Consult a tax professional for help navigating the new tax rules and how to best structure this business.
 
Contact Andy Here
 
*HELOC deductibility depends on whether it was “home equity indebtedness” or “acquisition indebtedness.” Acquisition indebtedness — mortgage debt used to acquire, build or substantially improve the residence — will be deductible, according to Michael Kitces, partner and director of Wealth Management at Pinnacle Advisory Group. 

Opes Advisors, A Division of Flagstar Bank, is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and does not provide legal or tax advice. Consult your accountant or tax advisor for advice specific to your situation.
While Opes Advisors, a division of Flagstar Bank, Member FDIC, uses all reasonable efforts to ensure that this information is current, accurate and complete on the date of publication, no representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of such information. Opes Advisors, a division of Flagstar Bank, Member FDIC, therefore, cannot be held liable for any loss arising or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information appearing in this email. 

For real estate professionals only. Not for distribution to consumers.
 

Recap On The New Tax Law For Home Owners

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

There are changes homeowners should be aware of with the new tax law effective as of 1/1/2018.  Below is the summary of the changes that may be useful information for you to know. 

The recommended protocol still is having your clients talk to their tax professional for more information regarding their taxes.

  1. The state and local tax deduction now has a cap.

The state and local tax deduction, or SALT, remains in place for those who itemize their taxes -- but now there's a $10,000 cap. Previously, filers could deduct an unlimited amount for state and local property taxes, plus income or sales taxes.

  1. The mortgage interest deduction has been lowered.

Current homeowners are in the clear. But from now on, anyone buying a new home will only be able to deduct the first $750,000 of their mortgage debt. That's down from $1 million. This is likely to affect people looking for homes in more expensive coastal regions.

  1. Home sellers who turn a profit keep their tax break.

Homeowners who sell their house for a gain will still be able to exclude up to $500,000 (or $250,000 for single filers) from capital gains, so long as they're selling their primary home and have lived there for two of the past five years.

  1. The deduction for moving expenses is also gone ...

There may be some exceptions for members of the military. But most people will no longer be able to deduct the cost of their U-Haul when they move for work.

  1. As is the tax preparation deduction ...

Before tax reform passed, people could deduct the cost of having their taxes prepared by a professional, or the money they spent on tax prep software. That break has been eliminated.

 

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Photo of The Rain Team Real Estate
The Rain Team
CA# 01169588 | CA# 01125976 | CA# 01908304
248 Main Street, Suite 200
Half Moon Bay CA 94019
Michael: 650-888-6361
Kathy: 650-888-6903
Fax: 866-396-0207

Kathy and Michael Rain of Coldwell Banker provides real estate services in the San Mateo County, California area including the surrounding communities: El Granda, Half Moon Bay, Montara, Moss Beach, Pacifica and San Mateo. Search for homes in San Mateo County. We list and sell residential real estate, investment properties, vacant land, lots for sale in the San Mateo County, California area.

Licensed in the State of California

Kathy Rain - CA BRE# 01169588 | Michael Rain - CA BRE# 01125976 | Coldwell Banker - CA BRE# 01908304
Cell Phone: (650) 888-6903 * Direct Phone: (650) 712-0411
San Mateo County Real Estate and Homes for Sale

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