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What Happens If I Skip a Mortgage Payment?

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Daniel Bortz

"What happens if I skip a mortgage payment?" is one of those questions we hope you never have to ask, but life is unpredictable: Sometimes no matter how carefully you plan, you may find yourself short on the funds you need to pay this crucial monthly bill. So what happens if you skip a mortgage payment for just one month?

Don’t worry—there's no need to panic quite yet. But there are consequences to missing a mortgage payment, so you'll want to know what's in store.

What if you're late on your mortgage payment?
Every home loan agreement offers borrowers a grace period for late payments. (Most mortgage payments are due the first day of the month but policies can vary, says Guy Cecala, chief executive and publisher of Inside Mortgage Finance.) Typically, there’s a 15-day grace period, in which case you would have 14 days after your payment is due to pay your bill without incurring a late fee. However, “I’ve seen some late fees kick in after seven days,” Cecala says, who recommends checking your policy carefully to see how long your grace period is.

Late fees are based on your mortgage agreement, loan type, and state regulations, but generally the average is 4% to 5% of the overdue payment. So, for a $1,000 monthly mortgage with a 5% late penalty, the fee would be $50. That might seem like a drop in the bucket, but “late fees are a good source of income for mortgage lenders,” Cecala points out.

How a missed mortgage payment affects your credit
Mortgage lenders typically report late payments to credit bureaus after they become 60 days past due—meaning you usually have two months to make up for a missed payment. After the 60-day mark though, your credit score (a reflection of how you've managed past debts) might take a big hit.

According to data from credit analysis firm FICO, someone with an excellent credit score—780 or above—could see it drop 90 to 110 points if the person has never missed a payment on any credit account. In comparison, someone with a 680 credit score and two pre-existing late payments on his credit report may see a 60- to 80-point drop for a mortgage payment delinquency.

Will my bank start foreclosure proceedings if I miss one payment?
The short answer is no.

“The foreclosure process takes a lot longer these days because of the foreclosure crisis [of 2008],” Cecala says. “Mortgage lenders don’t want to foreclose on your home because it results in a loss or a cost to them."

Nonetheless, your mortgage is technically in default if you’re more than 90 days late on your mortgage payments—even just one. At that point, you’ll receive a letter from your mortgage servicer notifying you that you’ve defaulted on your loan; you then typically have 90 days to pay off your most recent bill before your mortgage lender can begin foreclosure proceedings.

I don't think I can make next month’s payment. What are my options?
Your first step is to contact your mortgage servicer and explain your financial situation. “People often feel like they don’t want to turn themselves in, but you don’t know what your options are until you talk to your lender,” Cecala says. Plus, mortgage lenders tend be more accommodating if you notify them in advance that you can’t make an upcoming payment.

You might qualify for a special forbearance, a process where your servicer gives you a temporary break from your mortgage payments.

“It’s essentially an extended grace period,” says Cecala. Alternatively, you may be able to work out a repayment plan with your lender where you agree to pay down past-due amounts on your mortgage over a set period of time.

If you can’t afford to make your mortgage payments (say, due to a layoff or emergency medical expenses), Cecala also recommends looking at the federal government’s Home Affordable Modification Program.

“Through HAMP, homeowners who are not unemployed but struggling to make their monthly mortgage payments may lower their monthly payments and make them more affordable and sustainable for the long-term,” says the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s website. You’ll have to meet certain requirements to qualify. For example, you must have obtained your mortgage before Jan. 2, 2009, and “in general you can’t qualify if you have a jumbo loan,” Cecala says. (Call 1-888-995-4673 for free to speak with a HUD-approved housing counselor to see if you can take advantage of the program.)

How can I avoid a missed payment in the future?
The best way to ensure you won’t miss a mortgage payment, says Cecala, is to set up automatic bill pay so that the money is automatically withdrawn from your bank account each month. (You can do this easily through your bank either online or by phone.) You may even want to set up a dedicated checking account for your mortgage payments, and make arrangements with your employer to have a percentage of your income automatically deposited into the account each month.

Cecala offers one more tip: “If you run into problems making your mortgage payments, you probably want to avoid debt consolidation services. There are costs attached to them,” he says. “You’re generally always better off working with your loan servicer or a nonprofit that offers counseling and mortgage relief services.”


Photo By Tierra Mallorca on Unsplash

Moving From the City to the Suburbs? Ask These 8 Questions First

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Cathie Ericson

Sometimes the breaking point comes when you’ve circled the block for hours looking for a parking spot. Or when your baby is woken up yet again by the constant wail of sirens invading your street. Or when you start thinking of your nearby urban park as your "country space." That's it, you say—we're outta here.

A move to the suburbs can seem like an idyllic alternative to many of the hassles of city living. But inevitably you'll wind up wondering: Will the burbs really be all they’re cracked up to be? Will you be homesick for your former jampacked, hectic lives? Will you lose your minds completely out there in the sticks?

To help you suss out the pros and cons, we've spoken with real estate agents and culled the most important questions to consider before making the big leap from the city to the suburbs.

1. What will my commute be like?

Long, you might be assuming—especially if you have to commute to the city from your new home in the suburbs. But that's not always the case, says REALTOR® Roh Habibi with the Habibi Group in San Francisco.

“The reality is that commuting in the city may be a shorter distance and fewer miles, but traffic and congestion can create longer and more stressful commutes than most people realize,” he points out.

He cites a commute between neighborhoods in San Francisco (Marina District to Potrero Hill, for example) that can take the same amount of time as someone commuting into San Francisco from Oakland.

You’ll also want to figure out your public transportation options: Can you take a bus or train, or will you need to drive each day (which can really rack up expenses and stress levels)?

Check out the logistics of the transportation, including the convenience of the schedules, says Alison Bernstein, founder of Suburban Jungle Realty, which specializes in families who are moving to suburbs from the city.

2. What should I know about the schools?

Everyone wants great schools (the added resale value is enough to make even childless home buyers crave an A-plus district). But what makes a school “great” could be different for each family, Bernstein says. For instance, a highly touted school might not be the right fit if it’s a total pressure cooker that focuses exclusively on test scores or piles on the homework.

Make sure the school offers the services and educational opportunities that meet your family's needs, whether it’s a robust arts program or special ed, says Rob Nelson, a real estate broker for Center Coast Realty in Chicago.

You’ll also want to find out if it offers before- and after-school care, which is important for working parents, and whether it provides bus transportation and how much it costs.

3. Is there anything to do?

Urbanites are used to walking out the front door and having a world of possibilities within close proximity. Unfortunately, it might require a little more work to find something to do in suburbia—but don’t worry, it’s there.

Check with your local chamber of commerce or township website to see what’s going on, recommends Victoria Shtainer, residential real estate specialist at Compass real estate agency.

“For example, many think of the Hamptons as a summer destination—however, there are great events going on all year such as food and wine festivals, fall events, and a film festival," she says.

4. What are the town’s child care offerings?

Will you be wanting to use a day care center? Is there an active community of stay-at-home moms or dads? Consider these factors, because they'll have an impact not only on the logistics of your childcare, but also on your socializing and lifestyle.

Bernstein suggests that you check out a school drop-off and pickup, and bounce around town to check out who’s around during the day. You should also peruse the school calendar to see if most events and meetings are scheduled for the day or the evening.

5. Can I get a meal at 9 p.m.?

Most city dwellers are used to options being available 24/7, but in many burbs, it might feel like the streets are being rolled up at 9 p.m. Even more of a potential shock: Not everything is a quick app order or short walk away.

Shtainer recommends suburban newbies consider places that have a town center, with a cluster of shops and restaurants to bridge the gaps between the two lifestyles.

6. Who is going to fix my leaky toilet and maintain my yard?

The short answer: you. (Or at least someone you hire.)

If you're considering a move to a single-family home, be prepared to master some basic maintenance and repair skills. Try using a monthly maintenance calendar to keep things manageable; if your home isn't properly maintained, it could lead to hefty repair costs down the line.

7. What's the tax bite going to be?

Depending on the town, taxes can be higher than what a homeowner could be used to paying in their current city, Nelson says.

He advises finding out the property taxes and sales tax differences, since they can have a big impact on the cost of living and could make one neighborhood more affordable than another. It’s also smart to find out if there are plans for significant property tax increases in the near future.

8. What does everyone do in the summer?

Schools are important, but what people do in the summer is also critical to assessing the town’s personality, Bernstein notes.

Were you were envisioning block party barbecues and lemonade stands—when in fact the neighborhood clears out as everyone heads to Nantucket or sleep-away camp? Does everyone belong to a private club?

Do a little recon by asking potential neighbors or checking online events calendars. These days, there are lots of smartphone apps and websites that can lay out the neighborhood vibe without your actually being there.

We won't promise that moving to the suburbs will be an easy transition, but doing your homework ahead of time can help manage your expectations. And who knows? You might love it so much you'll wonder why you ever lived in the city.

 

Photo by Sylvie Tittel on Unsplash

 

Keeping Your House Clean with Dogs While It’s on the Market

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Leanne Potts

Oof. Houses that smell or look like pets have lived in them are just harder to sell.

Here’s how to de-dog your house before putting it on the market — and how to keep it that way while you sell.

#1 Steam Clean Everything Fabric
“Job number one is to take care of [the soft surfaces in your house],” says Melissa Maker, star of an eponymous YouTube channel and owner of a Toronto cleaning service. “They hold odors and hair like nothing else.”

This includes carpets, rugs, upholstered furniture, and even the drapes, she says. Pets rub against drapes, getting oils, odors, and fur on the fabric. Send curtains out for a professional cleaning.

#2 Groom Your Pet
Get your pet groomed by a pro before you list your house. You can do it yourself, but a pro can get more hair and dander off than you can — plus, all that gunk is better off in the groomer’s drain than yours.

Brush your furry friend regularly (outside, preferably) while your house is on the market. Any hair you get off on a brush is hair that won’t end up on your sofa or in your rugs.

#3 Clean Tile-Floor Grout
Tile resists dog stains, but grout is porous and sucks them up like a sponge. “I had a cat who had an accident on a tile floor, and the pee seeped into the grout,” Maker says. Steam clean grout to lift old smells and stains. If your grout is really cruddy, hire a pro to chip out the old grout and put in new — or DIY it if you have the skills.

#4 Get an Air Purifier Tower
To you, it smells like home. But your HVAC has been circulating the same hair and dander again and again (especially in hot and cold weather when the windows are closed).

Add an air purifier tower with a HEPA filter; it pulls hair and dander out of the air before they even reach your HVAC.

Most air ducts don’t need to be cleaned, especially if you change filters regularly. But if dander and fur seem to be taking over, hire a duct-cleaning company before putting your home on the market.

#5 Use Enzymatic Cleaners
They’re the special forces of odor busters. Enzymatic cleaners are made of beneficial bacteria that eat stains and odors. They’re formulated to stamp out a specific type of stain, so a cleanser that targets urine won’t be the same as one for vomit.

“They’re cultivated for a specific mess,” Maker says. Apply them liberally to stains regardless of how old they are, before listing your house.

#6 Get Rid of Scratch Marks
Pet toenails leave telltale marks on doors and walls. For walls and doors made of synthetic materials, you’ll just need to paint over the marks. For a wooden door, use wood-filler pen can fill in the scratches. For hardwood floors, rub out small scratches with steel wool or fine sandpaper followed by mineral spirits, wood filler, and polyurethane. For major damage, refinishing the hardwood is a good investment with a stellar 100% ROI.

#7 Absorb Odors With Charcoal
Charcoal pulls moisture and odors out of the air. You can get inconspicuous little bags of it to hang in places your pets love most. Or, just strategically stash some charcoal briquettes around the house.

Just be sure to get the ones that aren’t presoaked with lighter fluid.

#8 Spot Clean Furniture Daily
If you’re like many pet owners, trying to keep your dog off the couch completely isn’t worth the effort. Instead, cover your freshly-cleaned furniture with throws or pet covers, and wash them at least once a week. Vacuum rugs and carpets every day. Pet smells sink in fast.

For quick hair removal before a showing, wipe down the couch with rubber gloves. The hair comes right off.

#9 Get a Sniff Test
You’ve scrubbed everything, and you think your house smells like a dog has never set foot in the door. Get a second opinion as to whether the odors are gone, Maker says. “You may be noseblind. Ask your agent to walk through and give you an honest opinion.”

 

Photo by Oscar Sutton on Unsplash

 

What Is An In-Law Suite? A Smart Feature

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Robin Shreeves

What is an in-law suite? It's the most common name for a small dwelling on the same property as (and perhaps attached to) a single-family home, where an aging family member (or others) can live with some modicum of privacy and independence. It's often a separate space with its own bathroom, sometimes in a basement or over a garage.

In-law suites are also referred to as accessory dwelling units, multigenerational units, secondary suites, or granny flats. In Hawaii, they're known as ohana units. In the Southwest, they're frequently called casitas.

No matter what the name, they're a desirable feature in a home that comes in handy in many ways well beyond providing a place for mom alone. Here's everything homeowners need to know.

What is an in-law suite?

The traditional in-law suite can be either connected to the main dwelling of the home (perhaps in the basement), or an external, separate structure, like a small cottage on the property or a converted garage. Minimally, an in-law suite has a bedroom and full bathroom. It can also come with additional rooms, such as a sitting room or a small kitchen.

Alternate uses for separate suites

When not in use by an aging parent, an in-law suite can serve many purposes, making it a wise investment. Here are some uses to consider:

    Home office: "More and more buyers are looking for a place to work from home," says Mike Dinella, broker salesperson with Lenny, Vermaat & Leonard Inc., Realtors® in Haddonfield, NJ. "So this area could be the perfect spot for your small business."
    Guest quarters: When out-of-town guests come to visit, an in-law suite is the perfect place to give them a little privacy, with their own bedroom and bathroom.
    Residence for an older child: Adult children who may need to live at home while establishing themselves financially can use the space as an apartment, perhaps even paying a little rent.
    Short- of long-term rental apartment: Since many in-law suites are fully equipped apartments, they make ideal rental apartments, which can bring in added income from long-term renters or short-term rentals on Airbnb.

What's the cost of an in-law apartment?

The cost to add this amenity to your home varies widely, depending on the size, details, and whether it will be an addition to an existing home or a stand-alone structure. When adding an in-law suite to an existing home, expect to spend an average of $32,700 to $63,000. If you're building a new structure, it can cost as much as $125,000.

In-law apartments as a sales feature

Thanks to their versatility, in-law suites are an attractive feature to look for when buying a home—or to play up in your home if you're selling.

"A mother-in-law space, or even the potential for one, can make your home more desirable to buyers," says Dinella. "With multigenerational living on the rise, buyers are frustrated that they can’t find a home that meets their needs. There are limited choices, so they start looking at homes that can be easily modified into a residence with a mother-in-law apartment. If I have a listing with a first-floor bedroom and full bath, I’ve been advertising it as a 'potential multi-generational suite.' It creates a lot more buyer traffic."

The best advice Dinella has for homeowners who feel the need to add a space for aging in place to their existing home is to configure it with an open floor plan.

"An open floor plan has versatile uses after the fact. It's easier for buyers to envision the space as something else if they don't need to use it for its original intention," he says.

Are in-law suites legal?

Local ordinances vary when it comes to the amenities of an in-law suite and its use. To find the laws specific to your property, go to the zoning office with your lot and block number, to find out if having such a suite on your property is permitted.

If zoning laws do not allow an in-law apartment, it may be possible to get a variance.

"You may have to send out certified letters to the neighbors and get their signatures," says Dinella. "The cost of a variance could run up to $500."

You will also need to obtain building permits. Even then, there may still be limitations on what the suite can include or how it may be used. Some zoning laws do not allow full kitchens, because of the risk of stove fires. Some laws do not allow such suites to be rented out if they are no longer being used for an older relative.

Bottom line: Know the local laws before investing in a home with this amenity, if you are hoping that it may become a money maker.

Despite a few negatives, homeowners find the pros outweigh the cons, and that in-law suites are a smart investment both while they are living in the home and when they go to sell.

Photo by Emil Widlund on Unsplash

Home Security Tips You Should Already be Doing

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By Rachel Stevens

By the time you read this paragraph, another preventable break in will occur in the United States. Every 18 seconds, adding up to 200 an hour, home invaders successfully strike. Home security shouldn’t have to cost thousands of dollars with complicated devices. There are simple steps you can take to improve home security and peace of mind before leaving your home.  

Lock your door and windows  

This seems like an obvious tip, but 30 percent of burglars report breaking into a home through an unlocked window or door. Life gets busy and we rush to work, school, and activities. Take a few minutes before you leave to check the doors and recently opened windows on the first level. If you believe you’ll forget to, stick a note on your door to remind yourself before stepping out.  

Get a dog 

If you’ve always wanted a dog, here’s your excuse. Properly trained dogs are effective at deterring a burglar. Barking loudly will panic the intruder that they may bite or alert someone of their presence.  

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Photo by Ralph Kayden on Unsplash

Maintenance Must Dos

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Fall Home Selling Tips

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Many sellers try to avoid putting their home on the market during the fall. However, while the spring and summer markets are more popular, the fall market certainly doesn’t disappoint. Follow these tips to help ensure that your house flies off of the market before Old Man Winter arrives.

Create festive curb appeal.  
In a buyers’ market, it’s important to do everything you can to make your house look its best. Make sure that your yard, walkways, and gutters are free of leaves  and debris. Add a seasonal style with a festive-door wreath, planters filled with autumn-colored flowers, and a front porch lined with pumpkins.

Keep the lights on.
Gone are the days that it stays light well past dinnertime. Since the days are shorter, be sure that your house is illuminated both on the inside and outside. Brighten rooms by pulling up the blinds and pushing back the window dressings. Keep the front porch and walkway lights on so visitors have a better chance to experience the exterior of your house.

Check the HVAC.
The nights are becoming chilly, so it’s important to make sure that your HVAC system is up to par. It’s best to have it checked out before you put your house on the market. Not only will this reduce the chances of an offer falling through, it can help keep you and your guests warm and cozy during the colder months.

For more real estate tips for fall, visit www.americanlifestylemag.com/home.

 

The Best Home Improvement Ideas From the Internet

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By Carter Todd

What better way to start off the new year than by making some practical adjustments to your home? The slightest attention to detail can make every bit of difference, from your daily routine to impressing your visitors.

Use a sink filter

Installing a filter for your tap water is a great investment for your kitchen. Not only is it something you can do yourself, it will pay dividends in the long run. An under-sink filter is one of the only ways to guarantee clean and pure drinking water. With filtered sink water, you’ll be able to fill up your reusable water bottles right from the tap and won’t need to buy any more disposable plastic water bottles.

 

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Photo by Milan Popovic on Unsplash

 

Don’t Fall Short! 6 Home Maintenance Tasks You Should Tackle This Autumn!

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Autumn brings pumpkins and—love 'em or hate 'em—pumpkin spice lattes, sweater weather, and spooky skeletons. But most importantly, fall brings an end to a summer of outdoor adventures—and tedious yard tasks like weeding, mowing, and watering the lawn.

But just because the weather's cooling off doesn't mean your to-do list will, too. Before busting out the cinnamon spice and mulled wine, take on a few home maintenance tasks that will put you in good standing once temperatures dip.

"It's easier to prepare for a winter emergency in the fall," says Jericho McClellan, who works in construction management.

But fear not: We've got you covered with our checklist of home maintenance chores to tackle this season. Read on for details about where to start, and whom to call if you need backup.

1. Properly store your yard equipment

One of the best parts about fall: You can usually put your lawn mower into hibernation mode until spring.

But before you forget about that pesky piece of machinery entirely, remember this: Spring will suck if you don't prep your equipment this fall. That's because gasoline reacts with the air in the tank if left long enough, causing oxidation, which creates small deposits that can affect the performance of your mower.

And it's not just gas-powered equipment that needs a fall refresh.

Lester Poole, Lowe's live-nursery specialist, recommends running pressurized air through your pressure washers to remove any remaining water in the system, which will prevent freeze damage to the pumping mechanisms.

If your winter is particularly snowy and gritty, you'll be glad to have your pressure washer on high alert.

DIY: This project is easy to do yourself—just get rid of any spare gasoline. Many cities and counties have hazardous-waste programs, or your local auto parts store might take the old gas for you, too.

2. Protect your pipes

When temps dip below freezing, unprotected pipes can burst from exposure. Guard against burst pipes by wrapping them in foam insulation, closing foundation vents (more on that below), and opening cabinet doors under sinks to allow warm air to flow around supply lines. And make sure to keep your thermostat at 60 degrees or higher overnight.

If you haven't tracked down your home's water shut-offs yet, now's the time. They might be located outside your house or in your crawl space. Once you've found them, give them a test.

"The winter is not a fun time to try to figure that out, especially should a pipe burst," McClellan says. (More on that, too, in a minute.)

Now's also a good time to drain all of your exterior water hoses to prevent an icy emergency.

DIY: If your pipes do freeze, leave the affected faucets on and turn off your water supply, says Jenny Popis, a Lowe's Home Improvement spokeswoman. Then locate the freeze point by feeling the length of frozen pipes to determine which area is coldest. You can attempt to thaw it by wrapping the frozen section in washcloths soaked in hot water—then thaw until you have full water pressure.

Call in the pros: If you can't locate the freeze point or your pipes have burst, call in a licensed plumber, which will run $150 to $600 on average (depending on the severity of the leak).

3. Clear out your crawl space

While you're winterizing your pipes, peek around your crawl space. Is your HVAC system blocked by boxes of 50-year-old Mason jars? Can you get to any leaking pipes quickly?

DIY: While it's still warm, clear out any debris from your crawl space to ensure clear passage when winter's worst happens.

Call in the pros: Creeped out by the idea of crawling around under your house? Professional crawl space cleaners charge about $500 to $4,500, depending on the size of your house and the state of the space.

4. Close your crawl space vents

During your crawl space expedition, this is a must-do: Close the vents that circle your home's perimeter.

"The vents were placed there for a functional reason, not just aesthetics," says real estate agent, broker, and construction expert Ron Humes. "The problem is that most homeowners have no idea why they are there."

Here's why: In warm, wet seasons, crawl space vents allow airflow, which prevents moisture buildup. But if you leave them open during cold, dry weather, that chilly air will cool down your floorboards—making mornings uncomfortable.

DIY: "When the temperatures drop, slide those crawl space vents closed," Humes says. "Just remember to open them again in the spring."

If one of your vents is broken, replacements range from $20 to $50.

Call in the pros: If your crawl space stays damp through the fall and winter, you might want to consider waterproofing, dehumidifying, and sealing off your crawl space to prevent wet air. This can cost $1,500 to $15,000.

5. Kick-start your composting efforts                

Now's the perfect time, with all those leaves and dead plants, to start a compost pile. You don't even need a fancy compost spinner; sectioning off a corner of your yard is enough.

"Put yard waste to work by piling green leaves and clippings into a pile near your garden," Poole says. Next, layer with brown materials such as soil, dead leaves, and coffee grounds. Next up: kitchen scraps.

"Through the season, turn your mound using a pitchfork to expose oxygen to all ingredients and use it in the spring for fertilizer," Poole says.

Next year's tomatoes will thank you.

DIY: If your yard lacks space for a compost corner—or you have no interest in regular pitchforking—consider a tumbling composter. This well-reviewed model from Amazon costs about $100.

6. Protect your trees

Not all species of trees are winter-hardy—especially thin-barked ones like beech, aspens, or cherry trees. For these varietals, "sun-warmed sap quickly freezes at night and causes bark to split," Poole says.

He recommends wrapping your tree trunks with paper tree wrap, covering the entire bark from an inch above the soil to the lowest branches. Adhere the wrapping to the tree using duct tape to keep your trees in tiptop condition.

DIY: You can find 150 feet of paper tree wrap on Amazon for $18, although you may need a few rolls depending on how many trees need winter protection.

Call in the pros: Are your trees already looking the worse for wear? A tree service can help you sort out what's wrong. Pruning costs anywhere from $75 to $1,000.

 

Photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash.com

3 Top Return-On-Investment Projects

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 443

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The Rain Team
CA# 01169588 | CA# 01125976 | CA# 01908304
248 Main Street, Suite 200
Half Moon Bay CA 94019
Michael: 650-888-6361
Kathy: 650-888-6903
Fax: 866-396-0207

Kathy and Michael Rain of Coldwell Banker provides real estate services in the San Mateo County, California area including the surrounding communities: El Granda, Half Moon Bay, Montara, Moss Beach, Pacifica and San Mateo. Search for homes in San Mateo County. We list and sell residential real estate, investment properties, vacant land, lots for sale in the San Mateo County, California area.

Licensed in the State of California

Kathy Rain - CA BRE# 01169588 | Michael Rain - CA BRE# 01125976 | Coldwell Banker - CA BRE# 01908304  

Email: therainteam@coastal-realestate.com
Cell Phone: (650) 888-6903 * Direct Phone: (650) 712-0411
San Mateo County Real Estate and Homes for Sale

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