Real Estate Information

Coastal Real Estate Blog

Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 342

Market Snapshot: San Mateo County Real Estate Report

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Here is an updated Market Report summarizing recent real estate activity along the coastside. Please keep in mind that the values represented are based on current, detailed information from the regional Multiple Listing Service. If you need clarification on any of the figures or if you wish to take additional steps toward property ownership, please let us know. We are happy to help you. See the full report.


The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: What It Means for Homeowners

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team
Congress has now passed a sweeping tax bill that will affect almost every American. In addition to changing tax rates and deductions, these new rules affect a wide variety of personal and business activity.
 
The National Association of Realtors® has compiled a summary of provisions of interest, which may be of relevance to you.
We hope this information is helpful as you discuss The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act's impact with your financial advisor or legal counsel.
 
The Rain Team is here to help you with all of your real estate needs. Contact us today to see how we can help.

The New Tax Law and Its Housing Impact

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team
 Upcoming Changes for Some Home Buyers & Homeowners  

 By: Andy Block

Mortgage Advisor and Personal Finance Advisor

 
Under the new tax law, homeowners will have decisions to make in 2018, due to reductions or elimination of certain deductions under the new tax law.  
   
Real Estate: How The New Tax Law Compares to the Old Tax Law  
   
Measure Old Tax Law New Tax Law
Mortgage Interest Deduction Could deduct interest on up to 
$1 million in mortgages on primary & secondary residences
Can deduct interest on up to 
$750,000 in mortgages on 
primary & secondary residences
State and Local income, sales & Property Taxes  Can be deducted from federal income taxes Caps Federal income tax deduction at no more than $10,000 for total of all local state income, property and sales taxes
Interest on home equity debt (HELOCs) Home equity debt interest 
is deductible up to $100,000 if not disallowed by the AMT
Cannot deduct interest on home equity debt-new or existing on personal residence unless improving the residence* 

Equity debt on the personal residence is deductible if it is used to finance 
or improve a rental property
Capital Gains on Home Sales Can exclude up to $500,000 of gain for joint filers or $250,000 of gain for 
single filers from capital gains when selling a primary home, as long as the homeowner has lived in the 
residence for 2 of the past 5 years
No change
Source: Factcheck.org
 
$937,500 in purchase mortgages is the Max deduction for Mortgage Interest with 20% down.
The mortgage interest deduction is now limited to mortgages totaling up to $750,000 for primary and secondary homes. This means that homebuyers with a 20% down payment can only deduct 100% of the interest from their mortgages if their purchase price total is less than $937,500. 

 

Property Tax Impacts in High Tax States
State income tax, sales tax and property tax deductions (SALT) are now capped at $10,000 total. This is a significant hit for many high tax state residents in high cost areas. 

 

Tax Plan Calculator: Estimate Your Tax Liability
What does this mean for your bottom line? The Wall Street Journal’s tax plan calculator analyzes the impact of the biggest factors in the bill, so you can estimate your tax liability for 2018 through 2027. Click here for The Wall Street Journal Tax Plan Calculator.
 
Common Scenarios: How the Tax Bill Will Affect 8 Families
Bloomberg shows how taxes owed on wage and pass-through income (from a business you own) will change in 2018. These scenarios may remind you of someone you know: 
  • The multimillionaires in New York
  • The second home scenario in California
  • The small business owners in Pittsburgh
  • The suburban family in Westchester
  • Single in Manhattan
  • Married in Austin – a young couple who rents
  • Median income in Oregon
  • Renting in Milwaukee
 
Tax Workaround for Vacation Homes
Owners and buyers of second homes can potentially turn their vacation homes into an investment property by setting up a limited liability company. That allows them to write off interest and upkeep, while using the property part of the year for themselves, according to The Denver Post. Consult a tax professional for help navigating the new tax rules and how to best structure this business.
 
Contact Andy Here
 
*HELOC deductibility depends on whether it was “home equity indebtedness” or “acquisition indebtedness.” Acquisition indebtedness — mortgage debt used to acquire, build or substantially improve the residence — will be deductible, according to Michael Kitces, partner and director of Wealth Management at Pinnacle Advisory Group. 

Opes Advisors, A Division of Flagstar Bank, is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and does not provide legal or tax advice. Consult your accountant or tax advisor for advice specific to your situation.
While Opes Advisors, a division of Flagstar Bank, Member FDIC, uses all reasonable efforts to ensure that this information is current, accurate and complete on the date of publication, no representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of such information. Opes Advisors, a division of Flagstar Bank, Member FDIC, therefore, cannot be held liable for any loss arising or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information appearing in this email. 

For real estate professionals only. Not for distribution to consumers.
 

Recap On The New Tax Law For Home Owners

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

There are changes homeowners should be aware of with the new tax law effective as of 1/1/2018.  Below is the summary of the changes that may be useful information for you to know. 

The recommended protocol still is having your clients talk to their tax professional for more information regarding their taxes.

  1. The state and local tax deduction now has a cap.

The state and local tax deduction, or SALT, remains in place for those who itemize their taxes -- but now there's a $10,000 cap. Previously, filers could deduct an unlimited amount for state and local property taxes, plus income or sales taxes.

  1. The mortgage interest deduction has been lowered.

Current homeowners are in the clear. But from now on, anyone buying a new home will only be able to deduct the first $750,000 of their mortgage debt. That's down from $1 million. This is likely to affect people looking for homes in more expensive coastal regions.

  1. Home sellers who turn a profit keep their tax break.

Homeowners who sell their house for a gain will still be able to exclude up to $500,000 (or $250,000 for single filers) from capital gains, so long as they're selling their primary home and have lived there for two of the past five years.

  1. The deduction for moving expenses is also gone ...

There may be some exceptions for members of the military. But most people will no longer be able to deduct the cost of their U-Haul when they move for work.

  1. As is the tax preparation deduction ...

Before tax reform passed, people could deduct the cost of having their taxes prepared by a professional, or the money they spent on tax prep software. That break has been eliminated.

 

The 9 Hottest Interior Design And Decor Trends You'll See In 2018

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team
By: Holly Amaya

When it comes to home design and decor, we'll be the first to tell you to stick with what you love, no matter what the pros say. But if you can't escape that sinking feeling each time you walk through your front door that your decor is looking a little tired, well, don't despair. We've got you covered! We've already talked about the design trends you should ditch in the coming year. Now let's take a look at some of the hot new designs you might want to use for 2018 to give your home a fresh lease on life.

 

From splashy color palettes to bright yellow sofas and mixed metal everything, our stable of designers and tastemakers have given us the ultimate insiders' scoop on what'll be hot in 2018. And trust us: It'll be a gorgeous year. Here's what to watch:

1. Bold colors
Designers haven't yet had their fill of spaces decked out in deep, bold shades; this decor trend is appearing on our hot list for the second year in a row.

“As much as I love an all-white interior, rich jewel tones are making their way onto our walls and moldings in a big way—think ‘English library,’ but with peacock teal, black, or rich burnt orange colors,” says Oregon-based interior designer Arlene Lord.

The proof is in the paint: Sherwin-Williams' 2018 Color of the Year (Oceanside SW 6496) is an intense shade of blue-green, while Pantone recently announced the rich and regal Ultra Violet will reign supreme in the coming year.

Lord recommends pairing these jewel tones with bold, dustier shades to create a lush, layered look. (We like PPG’s Black Flame, an indigo-hued black that’s great for modern interiors; Glidden’s Deep Onyx, a classic no-fuss shade; and Olympic’s Black Magic.)

"Dipping a room in a dramatic shade like midnight navy, eggplant, or charcoal is a fun way to embrace a deep, rich color, and the result is deliciously inviting,” says Elissa Morgante, co-principal of Morgante Wilson Architects in Illinois.

Ready to really commit? Go all-in on this trend with dark or black trim.

“Outlining the room or windows in dark trim helps punctuate and call attention to unique features,” she says.

2. Mixed metallic
A few years back, mixing metals was a total no-no. But experts now agree that today’s homeowners want more than simple one or two copper or brass fixtures—they like seeing the stuff throughout a room or house.

“Buyers really love to see modern, eclectic choices such as a hammered copper light fixture above the kitchen island paired with sleek chrome faucets and cabinet hardware,” says Ken Fixler of Barnett Homes in Chicago.

To warm up the industrial feel of some metals, pair them with a natural stone like marble or limestone, and look for unexpected finishes like matte black, satin brass, black nickel, and unlacquered brass. Amp up the visual interest another notch by layering your metals across a variety of locations, from faucets to hardware to lighting and furniture.

3. Gen Z yellow
As usual, Beyoncé was way ahead of the curve on this one, smashing car windows and security cameras in an unforgettable yellow Cavalli dress in her epic video for "Lemonade." And as designers, fashionistas, and millennials will all tell you, the hue that's being dubbed "Gen Z yellow" is the one to watch.

Karen Wolf, of Karen B Wolf Interiors, calls it "positive, confident, vibrant, and enthusiastic."

"We have not seen this color emerge for quite some time," Wolf adds. "It feels fresh, happy, and young."

Designer Sarah Hullinger agrees, predicting the color will continue to be huge well into 2018.

“It’ll certainly make an impression, whether a bright ‘minion’ color or a burnt shade resembling curry or turmeric,” she says.

If you can't quite warm up to the idea of, say, a bright yellow sectional, test the waters with an accent chair or painted side table.

4. Quartz
In the kitchen, sleek quartz is taking the place of the ubiquitous granite and hard-to-clean marble.

“Quartz products are appealing to the ease of living that we all crave, and the surfaces are much more modern, clean, and versatile,” Lord says.

5. Light, textured wood floors
“Red-toned woods are fading in popularity, along with tropical exotic species” like Brazilian cherry or walnut, says Armstrong Flooring design manager Sara Babinski.

Instead, flooring trends are moving toward lighter color palettes in domestic American woods such as maple, pine, or hickory, she says.

Why? Light-hued woods—including natural tones and blond and whitewashed woods—brighten interior spaces and hide imperfections more easily, making them a great choice for families and households with pets. For extra credit, choose a distressed or wire-brushed wood, which offers vintage appeal with a less aggressive look than a scraped floor, and choose 5-inch-wide planks, which create a sense of openness and interior space.

If you decide to stick with dark flooring, designers recommend that you pair it with light walls and white trim for contrast.

6. Natural materials
“In interior design we're seeing a strong push toward eco-consciousness—looking toward items that are made of sustainable materials and have a natural feel to them,” says Ana Zuravliova, an interior designer at Roman Blinds Direct. “People care about the production, the history, and the story of their furniture more than they ever have before.”

While the sustainability element is a plus, the visual airiness of the materials is indicative of a move toward more minimalist interiors, says designer Erin Powell, virtual staging coordinator at 3-D rendering company roOmy.

"The less-is-more approach will continue—[think] lacy hammocks and daybeds and wicker and rattan furniture with a more modern edge," she says.

7. Concrete in unexpected places
Tired of basic granite in your kitchen and bath? Ditch it in favor of cool concrete—and then take your design up a notch by extending the material elsewhere in your house.

“From fireplaces to bath tubs, concrete is no longer the countertop alternative,” says designer Ana Cummings. “I’m seeing entire walls in concrete panels that look fantastic juxtaposed next to antiques or contemporary furnishings.”

8. Black fixtures Black fixtures will take the place of brass as the new hot home hardware, predicts Ryan Brown of Brown Design Group in Southern California. The first reason is easy: Black pretty much goes with everything. The second? Black fixtures—especially in matte finishes—are much easier to clean (and don't need to be cleaned as often) than lighter, polished metals.

“They look great in modern applications as well as transitional homes,” Brown says. “And the best part is, no water spots to clean off.”

9. Larger tiles
For years, white subway tile has been the go-to choice in many a modern (or renovated) bathroom and kitchen. But designer Karen Asprea of Whitehall Interiors notes a recent shift toward larger-format tile (and even slab-size sheets of porcelain).

"This shift is not only aesthetic but one of function, as larger tile has less grout and is both easier to install and maintain," Asprea says.

But if you're not on board with big, don't fret—designers agree the subway tile trend has life left in it.

“Clients want a really clean look for their homes and that doesn’t appear to be a trend that’s going away,” says Katie Jaydan, senior designer with White Crane Construction, a residential remodeling company in Minneapolis.

To mix things up a little and add visual interest, consider swapping out tired old cabinetry hardware with mixed metals (oh, hi, Tip No. 2) for a look that's oh-so-2018. (In a good way.)

 

8 Uncomfortable Realizations You'll Have Before Selling Your Home

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Daniel Bortz

Selling a home is just one of those experiences you've got to go through to truly understand—it's a lot more involved, emotional, and exasperating than you might think.

In an effort to prepare folks for this process—or at least help you laugh and nod if you're already in the thick of things—check out these moments that will strike a chord with any seller who's been there, done that, and lived to tell the tale.

1. 'Wow, there are a ton of real estate agents to choose from'

Finding a listing agent you can trust can be tricky, just based on the sheer number of real estate agents that are out there vying for your business.

To find agents in your area, use online tools such as realtor.com®'s Find a Realtor search, which will give you useful info such as number of years of job experience, number of homes sold, and the price of homes typically dealt with.

2. 'Excuse me, you want me to clean/paint/remove what?'

It can be hard to swallow negative criticism of your house from your agent, but this is an inherent part of selling a home. Indeed, you might think that each complaint—no matter how small—is a blow to your design aesthetic, or a knock on how well you’ve maintained the property. But the reality is this info can help you sell your home.

For example, if your agent says that your house is too cluttered or that the carpet needs to be cleaned, those are things that you can address. You wanted to sell this place, right?

3. 'Do I really have to leave when the buyer gets here?' Last-minute showing requests are a natural part of the home-selling experience. You could get a phone call from your agent saying that you have just five minutes before a potential buyer arrives. Regrettably, some sellers make the mistake of sticking around the house for showings, but that’s a huge mistake.

“Buyers already have apprehension about touring a stranger’s property,” says Peter Boscas, owner of Red Cedar Real Estate in Washington, DC. “That anxiety is ratcheted up when the sellers are home during the tour.”

If you want to give your home maximum exposure, you have to be prepared to step out at a moment’s notice. This also entails keeping your home relatively clean, since you may not have time to tidy up before a buyer shows up.

4. 'Why didn't that buyer show up?'

Sadly, no-shows are yet another common experience people have when selling their home. From my experience with home buyers, I can say that no-shows (or last-minute cancellations) aren’t personal. When I work with home buyers, I usually show them multiple properties in a day; hence, there’s a good chance we just fall behind and don’t make it to our last one or two showings—or we see a property that the buyer loves, so we cancel the remainder of that day’s showings.

The important thing to remember as a home seller: Don’t take no-shows personally.

5. 'My home doesn't feel like home anymore'

One thing I often advise home sellers to do is put some of their personal items in storage. This might include removing furniture so that we can professionally stage the home. Once you’ve taken these things out of your house, you might feel a bit strange living in your home while it’s for sale. (The living room just doesn’t look the same without your La-Z-Boy.)

The important thing to remember is this only temporary, and it can make your home sell faster.

6. 'Is that a true offer, or an insult?'

With all the emotions that accompany selling a house, many sellers feel insulted if they receive a low offer. One case sticks out in my memory: After presenting the seller with an offer that was $20,000 below list price, my client said to me, “Is this buyer on drugs?!”

Unfortunately, my client refused to even make a counteroffer. I understood his frustration, but the seller soon realized he made a mistake. The next two offers we received were also below list price. The home wasn’t overpriced, but home buyers are always looking to get the best deal that’s possible—which means many people make lowball offers to get the ball rolling on negotiations.

The take-home lesson: As a seller, you should consider every offer that you receive and, in most cases, at least make a counteroffer. Even if you make only a $5,000 price reduction, you never know how the buyer will respond.

7. 'Why is this taking so long?'

Unless you’re in a white-hot seller’s market, it might take a substantial period of time to sell your home—even if it’s priced aggressively. As long as your real estate agent is doing everything he or she can to market your property, do your best to be patient. The right buyer will come along. That being said, if your home sits on the market for more than a month, ask your agent whether you should make a price reduction.

8. 'Why am I having such a hard time saying goodbye?'

Even once you've sold your home, detaching emotionally from it can be tough, especially if you’ve lived in your house for a long time. Odds are every room triggers a memory—Thanksgiving dinners in the dining room, game nights in the family room, birthday parties in the playroom. Still, selling your house means it’s time to let go.

The Rain Team is here to help you with all of your real estate needs. Contact us today to see how we can help.

Market Snapshot: San Mateo County Real Estate Report

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Here is an updated Market Report summarizing recent real estate activity along the coastside. Please keep in mind that the values represented are based on current, detailed information from the regional Multiple Listing Service. If you need clarification on any of the figures or if you wish to take additional steps toward property ownership, please let us know. We are happy to help you. See the full report.


6 NEAR-GENIUS WAYS TO FOOL BURGLARS INTO THINKING YOU’RE HOME

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Stacey Freed

Your home: You love it, but sometimes you have to leave it.

 

Whether it’s the eight hours a day or eight days on a dreamy beach, allowing your biggest investment to fend for itself can be stressful. And it’s a legit concern; when your home looks empty, break-ins happen. A lot. Ugh.

You could deter burglars by never leaving your house again. Or you could do the next best (OK, way better) thing, and just make it look like someone is there all the time. Here’s how.

#1 Light Up a Room (From the Road)

Your parents may still rely on their lighting timer — on at 8 p.m., off at 7 a.m. That old-fashioned option still works, but apps are more fun. They not only turn your lights on and off, but can do so randomly for a more realistic effect. And you can decide to flip on your porch light while sipping a mojito in Fiji.

You can Google your options, but one affordable example is the Lutron Caséta Wireless system (about $80 for the device and $55 per switch). You replace your current wall switches with these wireless ones and “talk” to your lights from afar.

#2 Fake a Netflix Binge

Nothing says “we are definitely home” like the colorful glare of a television dancing in the window.

Put the little FakeTV gizmo where it can project light onto a curtain, and that’s exactly what your home will say to passersby.

The device (which runs between about $20 and $40 depending on size) plugs into an adapter and can either work on a timer or with a light sensor, so it can switch on when it gets dark.

#3 Change Up Your Shades Remotely

Leave your window shades down while you’re gone and you might as well put out a “Gone Fishin’” sign.

Check out wireless options to throw some shade on the go. Several companies have systems — including Hunter Douglas PowerView, Pella Insynctive, and Lutron Serena — that allow shades to go up and down at your command for about $300 to $500 a window.

#4 Make Some Noise

Burglars can change plans in a hurry at the first sound of life inside a home — they’re a bit tetchy that way. So, one option when you’re just gone for the day is a noise app, like Sleep And Noise Sounds that can play on a homebound phone, tablet, or computer. With noises like vacuuming and a boiling kettle, it can deter a thief who cracks open a window.

#5 Make Them Ring And Run

“Burglars will often ring your doorbell, and if no one answers, they’ll go around back and kick in the door,” says Deputy Michael Favata with the Monroe County Sheriff’s office in New York. Now you can answer the door with the Ring Video Doorbell ($180 for the basic model).

If someone pushes the doorbell, you can talk to them through an app on your phone. Whether it’s your nosey neighbor or a sketchy stranger, you can say, “I’m in the basement” while you’re really on the slopes. They’ll never know. And even if they don’t believe you, they know they’re being watched (insert devilish laugh here).

#6 Try a No-Tech Technique

Not everything requires a gadget. Here are ways to up your home security without downloading a single app:

  • Hire a house sitter. Then someone will be home.
  • If there’s snow, have a neighbor walk up and down the path to your door, shovel a passage up to the garage door and drive in and out of the driveway. If it’s hot out, ask them to keep your plants looking fresh with regular waterings. And don’t forget to bring them a nice gift from your getaway.
  • Ask friends, family, or neighbors to just be present on your property — use your patio, play in your yard, or bring in the mail.
  • Invite a neighbor to keep a car parked in your driveway. During the holidays, they may be happy if they need overflow for visitors.
  • Install a fake security camera for as low as $8. Burglars may not notice these fakes don’t have all the wiring necessary to be real. And their blinking red lights offer reasonable doubt.
  • Get a dog. A real dog. While you’re at work or running errands, nothing deters bad guys and gals like a barking, slobbery security guard. And when you go away, having a pet sitter stay can be as economical as some boarding facilities (especially if you have multiple dogs), and you’ll get the benefit of a human and canine sentinel.
  •  

5 HOLIDAY SPLURGES TO AVOID IF YOU HOPE TO SELL YOUR HOME NEXT YEAR

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

By: Audrey Ference

The holidays are officially here—and while merrymaking and gift shopping are likely top of mind, you may have to keep some of those celebratory urges in check if you're planning to sell your home next year. Why? Because many holiday season activities can come back to haunt you when your house is on the market, even if it's months later.

Don't believe us? Here are five holiday splurges to avoid if you hope to have a smooth home-selling process next year. It's our gift to you! (You'll thank us later.)

1. Don't do decorations that could damage your home

Yes, we know you want to display your holiday spirit. But avoid any decor that could leave behind damage you'll have to repair later—holes in the walls, marks on the floor, screws that mar the side of the house. If you have a live Christmas tree, be careful not to let spilled water sit on hardwood or laminate flooring, which can warp and stain. And it should go without saying that you don't want to paint walls dramatic colors; save the winter wonderland mural for another year.

Think about curb appeal, too. "Avoid blow-up animals and reindeer in the yard," advises Flor Blanchett, a REALTOR® at the Keyes Company in Florida. "When you take those things out, especially in the South, they leave spots on the grass that are totally dead for months afterward."

2. Don't clutter your home with huge holiday gifts

The mantra of anyone trying to sell a home? "Declutter, declutter, declutter," says Blanchett.

Don't buy a bunch of gifts that are going to have to be hidden away after the new year.

"If you have young children with toys all over the place, I advise packing it all away in a container under the stairs or somewhere people won't see it," she says.

The basic organizational rule is that you don't want your closets to appear bursting at the seams, which will give the impression there's not enough storage.

Obviously, nobody is saying that Santa has to skip your house this year, but consider forgoing the bulky play kitchen or drivable toy car in lieu of smaller action figures or electronics.

Remember: You're going to have to move all that stuff after you sell the house. You'll thank yourself at packing time if you spring for a gift certificate or jewelry instead of sports equipment or kitchen gadgets.

3. Don't buy appliances or furniture that may not fit your future home

It's another prime gift-giving no-no. Avoid shelling out for appliances, furniture, or anything that's specific to your current home's layout. Unless you already know where you're moving, that gorgeous (and large) new couch might not fit correctly in your new digs. And that sparkling new washer-dryer set is probably going to be a gift for the buyers, since appliances usually stay with the home. Grills, sheds, anything bulky—you're going to either gift it to your buyers in a few months or pay someone to move it. Save the heavy stuff for next year.

4. Don't take on too much holiday-related debt

This is not the year to live out your "new car with a giant bow on it" fantasies. Taking on debt, whether it's credit card debt or a car or boat loan, can hurt your chances of getting approved for a mortgage when you're ready to buy your next home. So, don't go out and buy expensive things; a lender will take note and it could work against you. When in doubt, ask first.

"Speak with your lender if making a real estate purchase after the sale on how much you can spend on big-ticket items," says Dillar Schwartz, a REALTOR® in Austin, TX.

5. Don't surprise the family with a new pet

The holidays are a common time for families to get a new furry friend—there are even adoption drives based around getting a holiday pet. However, right before you're ready to sell your house is not a terrific time to be housetraining a puppy or teaching a cat not to scratch the couch.

Showing a house with a pet can be challenging enough even when it's not a new pet, and then they're going to have to go through the wildly pet-unfriendly process of moving. However much you're longing for a cat, pup, or capybara, it just makes sense to wait until after the move. Especially the capybara.

Market Snapshot: San Mateo County Real Estate Report

by Kathy and Michael Rain - The Rain Team

Here is an updated Market Report summarizing recent real estate activity along the coastside. Please keep in mind that the values represented are based on current, detailed information from the regional Multiple Listing Service. If you need clarification on any of the figures or if you wish to take additional steps toward property ownership, please let us know. We are happy to help you. See the full report.

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 342

Syndication

Categories

Archives

Contact Information

Photo of The Rain Team Real Estate
The Rain Team
CA# 01169588 | CA# 01125976 | CA# 01908304
248 Main Street, Suite 200
Half Moon Bay CA 94019
Michael: 650-888-6361
Kathy: 650-888-6903
Fax: 866-396-0207

Kathy and Michael Rain of Coldwell Banker provides real estate services in the San Mateo County, California area including the surrounding communities: El Granda, Half Moon Bay, Montara, Moss Beach, Pacifica and San Mateo. Search for homes in San Mateo County. We list and sell residential real estate, investment properties, vacant land, lots for sale in the San Mateo County, California area.

Licensed in the State of California

Kathy Rain - CA BRE# 01169588 | Michael Rain - CA BRE# 01125976 | Coldwell Banker - CA BRE# 01908304
Cell Phone: (650) 888-6903 * Direct Phone: (650) 712-0411
San Mateo County Real Estate and Homes for Sale

Equal Housing Opportunity